Calculate vSphere 5 Licenses with Powershell (UPDATED)

VMware has announced the next generation of vSphere yesterday. Besides lots of new features, vSphere 5 also comes with a new licensing structure. For every licensed physical CPU, you get a certain amount of vRAM, which you will be able to allocate to virtual machine. Only the running VM’s will count towards your license limit.
Curious how the vSphere 5 licensing model will impact your license cost? Want to know how many vSphere 5 liceses you will need? The following script calculates exactly how many licenses you need for the different editions and how much overhead you will have left.

UPDATE 04-AUG-2011: vmware has increased vRAM entitlements for all editions of vSphere 5! I have updated the script (shown below and the attached script). The screenshot is still the old one. Please read the new Licensing PDF here for all the details.

NOTE: Please note that I add up all your pCpu’s, ignoring current license types. I also add up all your current vRAM usage (RAM assigned to powered on VM’s). I then show you different scenarios if you purchase license type x for ALL your pCpu’s. If your environment consists of a mix of vSphere editions, check out Alan Renouf’s script to analyse your environment.


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Examine VMware CPU Ready Times with Powershell

When your (VMware) consolidation ratios are becoming high, it might be smart to keep an eye on your vm’s CPU Ready Times. Unfortunately, by default, the VI Client will only show realtime ready time statistics. Plus you’d have to look at each vm individually. Thank God VMware for the PowerCLI! Read this document for more information on how to interpret the results.

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