Set VMware Snapshot Location with Powershell

Snapshots are m*th3rfcukers. If you’re not careful, they will mass-murder your vms. Yet they allow you to time-travel! You want to use them, but how to prevent a massacre? Here’s how: relocate the delta files.

When you create a snapshot, the current state of the vm is preserved by leaving the disk files alone. All changes since the moment of creating the snapshot are written to delta files. The delta files are stored in the vm’s working directory. The working directory is – by default – the location where the vmx and other config files reside. If that datastore runs out of free space – especially if it also contains disk files – you’re in a bit of a kerfuffle. Vms not booting or being frozen as if they stared into Medusa’s reptoid eyes.

So you can do two things: reserve overhead in your datastores and stay afraid some overactive snapshot might destroy your environment, or set the working directory of your vms to some big-ass datastore you don’t use for anything else and let the snapshots enjoy themselves. If they fill up the datastore, they only kill all vms with snapshots, not the rest.

But how, you ask? You can edit the vmx files of you vms manually - which requires your vms to be powered down – and add the line: workingDir = “/vmfs/volumes/<insanely long guid you need to somehow find>/”

Or, you run my script and change the working location on the fly:

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Create a vSwitch Port Overview with Powershell

WARNING: VMware vmotion does not check wether there are sufficient ports available on the virtual switch on the destination host. Migrating a vm to a host with insufficient ports will cause the vmotion to complete without warnings, yet the virtual NIC will be disconnected! This issue is descripbed in this KB article.
The solution to this problem is to create vSwitches with sufficient ports, obviously. Do you want to know how many ports are currently being used on every vSwitch in your environment? vSphere PowerCLI to the rescue! Try the following script:

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Examine VMware CPU Ready Times with Powershell

When your (VMware) consolidation ratios are becoming high, it might be smart to keep an eye on your vm’s CPU Ready Times. Unfortunately, by default, the VI Client will only show realtime ready time statistics. Plus you’d have to look at each vm individually. Thank God VMware for the PowerCLI! Read this document for more information on how to interpret the results.

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Managing Scheduled Tasks Remotely Using Powershell

The following Powershell functions allow you to manage querying, creating and removing scheduled tasks on one or more computers remotely.
The functions use schtasks.exe, which is included in Windows. Unlike the Win32_ScheduledJob WMI class, the schtasks.exe commandline tool will show manually created tasks, as well as script-created ones. The examples show some, but not all parameters in action. I think the parameter names are descriptive enough to figure it out, really. If not, take a look at schtasks.exe /?. One tip: try piping a list of computer names to foreach-object and into this function.

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Increment PowerGUI Xml Version with Powershell

If you are using PowerGUI (which you should) and some of your collaegues do too, you might want to use a central configuration. Whenever you want to update the central configuration xml file, you need to increment the version number in order to push this change out to your collaegues. The following function increments the version number for you and even allows you to store the new file to the central location at the same time. All without having to edit the complex xml file manually. It even saves a backup copy of your central config file in case you mess up ;) It assumes you use a simple x.y version number, so please start out with 2.0 when setting up your config.
To update your central config: just make the modifications within PowerGUI and then run this function.

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WSUS Cleanup with Powershell

If you manage a Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) server, you probably run the Server Cleanup Wizard every once and a while. It removes old and superseded updates and computers that haven’t reported their status for more than 30 days. Wouldn’t it be nice to schedule such a cleanup to run every month? Too bad there’s no command line tool I know of that can help you out with this. Powershell to the rescue!
Powershell can not only run the built-in commandlets or even those added by snapins. It can leverage the full power of the .NET Framework. Browse the MSDN Library if you want to find more cool things you can do with it. Here’s a script that uses this information to run the cleanup wizard:

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