Find LUN ID’s in VMware with Powershell

Determining the LUN ID for a specific LUN in your VMware Infrastructure used to be simple. It was listed as one of the properties of the datastore you selected in the VI Client. Nowadays, more often than not, I dont see the LUN ID in the vSphere Client. Instead, I see some sort of identifier like “EMC Fibre Channel Disk (sym.12673548127)”.
Even more unfortunate is the fact that all my scripts show the same identifier, where they used to show the LUN ID. So I decided to create a script that can translate the identifier (sometimes referred to as Canonical Name) back to a LUN ID.
By the way: in the vSphere Client, you can still find the LUN ID by opening the datastore’s properties window and clicking Manage Paths. Or you could write down the canonical name, switch to the devices view and look up the device there. That is essentially what my script does for you.
Here we go:
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Fix DCOM Event 10005 with Powershell

Do you get these events in your system log?

The service cannot be started, either because it is disabled or because it has no enabled devices associated with it. attempting to start the service ntmssvc with arguments “-Service” in order to run the server:
{D61A27C6-8F53-11D0-BFA0-00A024151983}

Symantec explains this is caused by disabling the Removable Storage Manager and provides a solution.

Removing those registry keys on a bunch of servers manually is a pain. Modifying DCOM settings even more so. So I explored fixing this with Powershell.

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