I’ve created another way to gather and display VMware Virtual Disk information with the Powershell VI Toolkit.

The attached script generates a csv-file with all Virtual Machines’ Disks, in which Datastore they are stored, the LUN IDs of the extents that make up this Datastore (in HEX) and the Vendor of the SAN those LUNs are on (just in case you have multiple). Simpy a great way to determine which LUNs are used by which virtual server(s) in a complex environment.

diskinfo

By the way: the script is filled with comments to allow you to learn how it works.

create-vmdiskoverview (Rename to .ps1)

Enjoy!

Hugo

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28 Responses to Another way to gather VMware disk info with Powershell

  1. [...] Hugo just posted a follow up to his original blog. This new script creates a CSV file, which can be imported in to Excel for [...]

  2. NiTRo says:

    Hi Hugo,

    I’d like to a row for hostname but i’m not very smart in powershell, may you help me ?

    Anyway, your script is very cool :)

    Thx

  3. admin says:

    @NiTRo
    NiTRo,
    Adjust the following line:
    Select VM, Description, Disk, Datastore, hexLUN0, hexLUN1, hexLUN2, hexLUN3, SAN # Create output object

    Replace it with this:
    Select VMHost, VM, Description, Disk, Datastore, hexLUN0, hexLUN1, hexLUN2, hexLUN3, SAN # Create output object

    And add the following line below it:
    $myObj.VMHost = $VMHost.Name # ESX Server Name

    Thanks,
    Hugo

  4. NiTRo says:

    Thanks Hugo, it works like a charm !

  5. NiTRo says:

    I also wish i can get a field value from the VC, do you know if it is possible ?

    Thanks

  6. Another way to gather VMware disk info with Powershell « H9Newser’s Blog says:

    [...] 9, 2009 Another way to gather VMware disk info with Powershell: [...]

  7. [...] au script Powershell d’Hugo de PeetersOnline.nl, vous pourrez générer un fichier csv contenant la liste des VM [...]

  8. David says:

    Is there a way to modify this so that it would pull back sizes of the disks as well?

  9. Hugo says:

    @David
    @David
    Easy! Just modify this line:
    Select VM, Description, Disk, Datastore, hexLUN0, hexLUN1, hexLUN2, hexLUN3, SAN # Create output object
    Change it into this:
    Select VM, Description, Disk, DiskSizeGB, Datastore, hexLUN0, hexLUN1, hexLUN2, hexLUN3, SAN # Create output object
    And add this line below it:
    $myObj.DiskSizeGB = [math]::Round(($DISK.CapacityKB * 1KB / 1GB),0) #Disk Size

    Hugo

  10. David says:

    @Hugo
    Thank you Hugo. This was a big help.

  11. David says:

    Is there any way for RDMs to show up as RDMs? I noticed they show up as virtual disks on the datastore in which the mapping file exists. Wondering if there’s a way to dive deeper, and identify these as RDMs and indicate LUN ID. Also, any good resources for VI-Toolkit education? Been googling, but resources are limited. Thanks.

  12. Eric says:

    Hugo,

    This script is great. It gives me almost everything I need… there is one thing I would like. I would like to add a column for the name of the VMDK as well. Being a newbie at scripting… is that possible?

  13. admin says:

    @Eric
    Modify this line:
    Select VM, Description, Disk, Datastore, hexLUN0, hexLUN1, hexLUN2, hexLUN3, SAN # Create output object
    into:
    Select VM, Description, Disk, Datastore, VMDK, hexLUN0, hexLUN1, hexLUN2, hexLUN3, SAN # Create output object

    Add the following line below that line:
    $myObj.VMDK = $DISK.Filename.Split(“/”)[1]

    • Mike says:

      Going off of the Question from Hugo on 1/27, is there a way to give the “used” space of the guest’s VMDK? I’m trying to monitor the growth on a differential disk of link-cloned VDI guests.

  14. invisible says:

    Hugo,

    Great script, thank you. But when I run it scripts runs for number of minutes and than I got

    ————————–
    You cannot call a method on a null-valued expression.
    At :line:29 char:41
    + $myObj.Datastore = $DISK.Filename.Split <<<< (“[]“)[1] # Datastore Name

    ————————–

    and no csv file is created.

  15. admin says:

    @invisible I’m guessing you have $ErrorActionPreference set to “Stop”. Try setting: $ErrorActionPreference = “Continue”. You will still see a lot of errors, but the script will finish.
    The reason for this script to generate errors, is that is assumes three disks are present in each and eveny vm. I had to pick a number and keep it the same for all the vm’s, because of difficulties displaying irregular information. Anyway, let me know if this helps.
    Hugo

  16. Harm says:

    This script is very useful. I how do you change the number of present disks that the script scans for from 3 to 4? We have various VMs with more than 3 virtual disks. Thanks!

  17. admin says:

    @Harm
    The script does loop through ALL your disks. Only problem if you have more than 4 extents in a datastore. Then you should add hexLUN… to the following line:

    Modify line:
    Select VM, Description, Disk, Datastore, hexLUN0, hexLUN1, hexLUN2, hexLUN3, SAN # Create output object

    Into: Select VM, Description, Disk, Datastore, hexLUN0, hexLUN1, hexLUN2, hexLUN3, hexLUN4, SAN # Create output object

    Etc.

    Hugo

  18. Michael says:

    Hi Hugo,

    firstly, a great script! Can I also add a column for the datacenter? I am also new with powershell and scripting in general and I didn’t find anything about $myObj.* and the “Select” part in your script.
    Thanks.

  19. admin says:

    @Michael
    I use “$myObj = “” | Select Name, Etc” to create custom objects to hold the output of my scripts. Read more here: http://www.peetersonline.nl/?s=advice
    You could add an outer loop doing ForEach ($Datacenter in Get-datacenter){…} and add a property named $myObj.Datacenter with the value $Datacenter.Name.
    Read some of the scripts on my site to get some feeling on how this works.
    Hugo

  20. Ejire says:

    Hi Hugo,
    I also wish I can get a field value from the Disk path or disk drive letter, do you know if it is possible ?

    Thanks

  21. Lars says:

    Hi Hugo,
    Your script helped me a lot.
    Thanks for sharing.

  22. Frank says:

    Hi Hugo,

    Could you give me an example of an outer loop to get the cluster that each VM is connected to. For some reason my loop doesn’t end.

    Thanks!

  23. Chris says:

    Great post, I was trying to write my own script to do just this.

    Thanks.

  24. Patrick says:

    Script ran and listed the VMs but the hexLUN0 field = 0 for all vm’s and the rest of the hexLUN# fields are blank. The disks that aren’t listing properly are physical compatibility mode RDM drives….

    Any ideas?

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